CC Speech 1: The Icebreaker


The Icebreaker

Today starts a new series of posts where I will discuss the different projects in the Toastmasters Educational Program.  I will give a brief explanation of the project and then I will describe what I did to complete it.

I will start with the Competent Communicator Series, which is a group of ten speech projects.  Each project builds on skills practiced in previous speeches and challenges the speaker to work on new ones.

The goal of the Ice Breaker, as the first speech in the series, is mainly just to get up in front of the club and speak.  The secondary goal is to introduce yourself to the club by speaking about something to do with your life.

I gave my Ice Breaker just over a year ago on September 23rd, 2009.  The title was: “No Sleep ‘Til Brooklyn“.  I spoke about growing up in a big, Roman Catholic Family in Brooklyn.

The combination of it being my first speech, being very personal, and the fact that we had a large group of guests at the meeting for the first time, resulted in me being extremely nervous.  One of the feedback comments I received was “For God’s Sake, Man: Breathe!”

Despite the nervousness (it took an hour or so to stop shaking afterwards), I really enjoyed the experience.  It got me started, which is the purpose of the Ice Breaker.

Competent Communicator Speeches

The Ice Breaker

Organize Your Speech

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About Dan Kingsepp, ACS, ALS
I'm starting this blog to share my thought on the use of the English language and my experiences as a Toastmaster.

5 Responses to CC Speech 1: The Icebreaker

  1. Jim Kingsepp says:

    Oddly enough I also grew up in a big, Roman Catholic family in Brooklyn. I wonder if our experiences were similar.

    Do you have any video of this speech? I’d like to see it if you do.

    • No video. It was my first speech and I was very nervous, so I’m glad it wasn’t recorded. But I can e-mail you the text.

  2. Pingback: CL Project 5: Planning and Implementation | On Language

  3. Pingback: CC Speech 2: Organize Your Speech « On Language

  4. Pingback: Humorously Speaking: Leave Them With A Smile « On Language

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